Transforming the future of ageing

Working group members

Jean-Pierre Michel
Chair
Professor
Geneva University
Declaration of interests
Diana Kuh
Vice-Chair
Professor
University College London
Declaration of interests
Rose Anne Kenny
Vice-Chair
Professor
Trinity College Dublin
Declaration of interests
Richard Reilly
Vice-Chair
Professor
Trinity College Dublin
Declaration of interests
Liat Ayalon
Professor
Bar Ilan University
Declaration of interests
Axel Boersch-Supan
Professor
Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy
Declaration of interests
Jacques Bringer
Professor
Universiy of Montpellier
Declaration of interests
Alfonso Cruz Jentoft
Professor
Hospital University Ramón & Cajal
Declaration of interests
Giovanni Gambassi
Associate Professor
Catholic University of Sacro Cuore
Declaration of interests
Alan Gow
Associate Professor
Heriot-Watt University
Declaration of interests
Tomasz Grodzicki
Professor
Jagellionian University Medical College
Declaration of interests
Lenka Lhotska
Professor
Czech Technical University in Prague
Declaration of interests
Ekaterina Markova
Senior Research Fellow
Institute for the Study of Societies and Knowledge
Declaration of interests
Rytis Maskeliunas
Professor
Kauno Technical University
Declaration of interests
Carlo Patrono
Professor
Catholic University School of Medicine
Declaration of interests
Lene Juel Rasmussen
Professor
University of Copenhagen
Declaration of interests
Regina Roller-Wirnsberger
Professor
Medical University of Graz
Declaration of interests
Archana Singh-Manoux
Professor
Inserm
Declaration of interests
Eline Slagboom
Professor
Leiden University Medical Centre
Declaration of interests
Anne Pieter van der Mei
Professor
Maastricht University
Declaration of interests
Leo van Wissen
Professor
Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute, University of Groningen
Declaration of interests
Jose Vina
Professor
University of Valencia
Declaration of interests

In Europe and around the world, people are living longer than ever before. This is one of the greatest achievements of the past century, but it also brings challenges for European societies and the EU as a whole.

We must adjust to an ageing and shrinking workforce, and find financially viable ways to deliver high-quality health and social care for all.

What the report says

SAPEA’s evidence review report shows that the ageing process needs to be transformed. Europe must tackle the challenges presented by ageing in every generation.

  • When it comes to predicting how people age, evidence indicates that genetic factors are relatively minor compared to lifestyle behaviours such as a healthy diet and physical activity. Policies to promote these behaviours from early childhood, and even in unborn children, contribute directly to a healthy ageing process across people’s whole lives.
  • Ageing in the future will take place in a very different context from the past and will be profoundly affected by phenomena such as climate change, air pollution and antibiotic resistance, as well as ongoing social changes. Policies will only be successful if they accommodate these changes.
  • Technology is already changing the experience of ageing, including wearable and assistive devices and the advent of AI. But barriers of acceptance and practicality must be overcome.
  • Education improvements at a young age are vital not only to improve individual health, but also to equip our future workforce with the skills it needs to support an ageing population in a rapidly changing society.

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